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“Rebirth after the Holocaust: The Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons Camp, 1945-1950,” a haunting photo-documentary exhibition, was recently presented in the Kelso Art Center/Student Gallery. The exhibit illuminated the inspiring and untold histories of Holocaust survivors in the years immediately following their liberation from the Nazis.

"Rebirth after the Holocaust: The Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons Camp, 1945-1950," a haunting photo-documentary exhibition, was recently presented in the Kelso Art Center/Student Gallery. The exhibit illuminated the inspiring and untold histories of Holocaust survivors in the years immediately following their liberation from the Nazis. Bergen-Belsen, a wartime concentration camp, became the largest displaced persons camp in Germany at a time when over 250,000 displaced, homeless Jewish survivors sought to recover from the war's destruction. Survivors fought to rebuild families and communities, regain their physical health, and gather the strength and hope to create new homes in new lands. For five years, Bergen-Belsen became a self-governed Jewish community with political, cultural, religious, educational and social activities that renewed Jewish life. It was also a vibrant center of rehabilitation, reconstruction and rebirth. The exhibition was presented by the University of the Incarnate Word, The Torch of the Holocaust Memorial of San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures.

A look inside “Rebirth after the Holocaust: The Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons Camp, 1945-1950.” 

Bergen-Belsen, a wartime concentration camp, became the largest displaced persons camp in Germany at a time when over 250,000 displaced, homeless Jewish survivors sought to recover from the war’s destruction. Survivors fought to rebuild families and communities, regain their physical health, and gather the strength and hope to create new homes in new lands. For five years, Bergen-Belsen became a self-governed Jewish community with political, cultural, religious, educational and social activities that renewed Jewish life. It was also a vibrant center of rehabilitation, reconstruction and rebirth.

The exhibition was presented by the University of the Incarnate Word, The Torch of the Holocaust Memorial of San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures.

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